03 December 2017

Unusual Historicals is closing

After more than 10 years, the Unusual Historicals blog is closing. Thank you to all guests, contributors, and readers. We hope you have enjoyed our posts and found them informative. No future content will be posted to the blog after December 31, 2017, and all comments will be closed. Posts will remain available and searchable on the site.

Please email us if you have any final questions about the blog's content. Again, thank you.

03 September 2017

Author Interview: Xina Marie Uhl on WHITER PASTURES

This week, we're pleased to welcome author Xina Marie Uhl with her latest release, WHITER PASTURES (Icebound series). Here's the blurb about the novelette.

A romantic novelette in the Icebound series, an ongoing collection of polar delights.

Behold dogsleds and penguins. Howling winds and cold, pitiless wastes. This is Antarctica, where the intrepid inhabitants of the frozen ends of the earth battle the terrain, and each other, to find love—in a past much like that of the  early 1900s. 

Reluctant spinster Florance Barton fled to the British Antarctic base to escape a scandalous love affair. Amidst the handful of other women there, Florance is the perfect chambermaid, meek, mild, and forgettable. No one has a clue that she’s also a novice spy. 

When handsome young Handy McHanagan arrives at the base, he sets everyone agog. He’s charming, artistic, and ... an accomplished gardener. His arrival may be a mistake on the part of naval command. Or is it something more sinister?

Killer seals and subzero ice storms and aren’t the only danger in Antarctica: a enemy spy is on the loose. Florance has been ordered to choose between queen and country and her heart. Because penguin is off the menu nowand murder is its replacement.

Get your copy:


Ebook (Amazon: Kindle Unlimited or $1.49 purchase price)
XC Publishing / ISBN-13: 978-1-930805-91-0 / 41 pages
Author website / Amazon book page / Goodreads book page



**Q&A with Xina Marie Uhl**


Before we get started, I have a matter of confusion to clear up. What’s with your name? Did you make it up, or were your parents just weird?   

No, I did not make it up, although you are not the first person to ask me that question. My name is pronounced Zeena, though it is spelled X-I-N-A. When I was growing up, I would always know when the teacher got to my name due to the pause and stumbling pronouncement. After Xena: Warrior Princess came out people began to say my name correctly for the most part. I have met a few Zinas - who spell their names with a Z. Also a few people have admitted that their dogs were named Zina. Since I love dogs I find that a compliment. 

Your latest release, Whiter Pastures, revolves around a maid in Antarctica who must overcome her timidity to carry out a distressing mission from faraway England. Dashing young Handy McHanagan is the object of attention and it’s unclear whether he’s a good guy or a bad guy until the resolution. In the course of the adventure, there are many unusual elements such as spinsters, bribery, drunkenness, explosions, panic attacks, hysteria, art exhibits, and special varieties of snuff. How on earth did you combine all these?

The question might better be asked: why did I combine all these? Alas, the answer is unknowable. I have one of those restless minds that is forever googling faraway places and reading explorers’ log books and, when I’m tired of that, watching dark comedies. Somehow that all meshed into one strange, but I hope diverting and amusing tale.

Don’t worry about that, Xina--I can safely say that the answer is yes. Tallyho, then! I can’t recall ever seeing a historical romance set in Antarctica before. When does the story take place and what caused you to set it there?

The story takes place in 1900, which is just prior to Robert Falcon Scott’s first Antarctic expedition, the Discovery, in 1901. The idea is that the British Antarctic Base at Hope Bay exists to support the explorers who come later as well as conducting their own scientific and military endeavors.

As for why I set the story there, I’ve long been curious about the frozen reaches of the earth, probably because I was raised in the desert and have never lived anywhere that falls below 32 degrees Fahrenheit in winter. I’m an avid traveler and I love to read about explorers as well. It took such grit and determination and sheer physical strength to scale mountains, ride rapids, and sail iceberg-choked seas, alone and in fear for one’s life. As a soft hearted landlubber I marvel at such deeds.

I can trace my fascination with Antarctica to an official beginning when I read Endurance by Alfred Lansing, the true story of Ernest Shackleton’s incredible voyage for the South Pole in 1914. When he and his crew became stranded the real adventure began. The book is full of more twists, turns, and excitement than any fictional thriller, and it is all the more mind-blowing because Shackleton and his men braved the most difficult circumstances to triumph in the end. Since then, I’ve done a lot of reading about Antarctica, and I’m first in line to see documentaries like the recent A Year on the Ice, which shows some stunning photography of the Antarctic winter, the first time that’s been done in a movie.

The story includes a few women who live and work on the British Antarctic Base in Hope Bay. How historically accurate is it?

Women weren’t part of the Antarctic bases. In fact, the British Antarctic Base wasn’t built until 1945. However, the Swedes discovered the area in 1902 and built a stone hut in 1903 which still stands in part today. The Norwegian Polar Institute has a great map of Antarctica to orient readers below, with the Hope Bay station located at the very tip of the Antarctic Peninsula near Deception Island.


Because the British base wasn’t actually established until 1945, I took liberties with that detail. I also took liberties with setting women there. I did give them roles that women would likely perform such as cooks, maids, and secretaries. The protagonist, Florance, is a maid. When she’s not spying for certain Scandinavians, that is. As you can probably tell, the story has a decidedly quirky bent, but besides that, and the liberties I took with characters, the story is accurate, but most decidedly fiction. In addition to writing historical fiction, I write historical nonfiction as a freelancer, and I have two degrees in history. So I’m a mean researcher. But good history does not always translate into good fiction so the narrative must always come first. Still, it was loads of fun researching Antarctic expeditions, and my favorite form of procrastination when I should have been writing. I even consulted supply lists to make sure that I was mentioning the correct foods. Can’t forget mockturtle soup and laxative vegetables, you know!

The main character’s name, Florance, is spelled in an unusual manner. There are also unusual names throughout the story - Handy, Gorge, and Electa. Is that intentional?

Yes, definitely.  I happened upon this article on the Mental Floss website about the least popular American baby names from 1880 through 1930, according to Social Security records. The names are, by turns, cringe-worthy and hilarious. It’s fascinating to see the diversity and the bad spellings, though really not terribly surprising, I suppose. We have some strangely spelled names today, too. Anyhow, a perfect storm formed in my mind - the explorer mania, Antarctic interest, bizarre names, and my silly sense of humor collided. I decided to write a series of stories called Icebound, which would focus on relationships at the frozen ends of the earth, and I would use names from this list. There are plenty to choose from and they should lead to lots and lots of stories.

The story is a mix of genres - historical, humor, romance, action. What does that mix say about your writing in general?

That I don’t like to color inside the lines, I suppose. I have fiction that is fantasy, humor, cat-related, romantic, and a mixture of all of the above. I want readers to be fully entertained and engaged by my work and to me, that means operating on a number of different levels, genre-wise. The heart and soul of the Icebound stories is relationships, though. That’s why I say they are romances with historical and humorous elements.

Last question: what’s next after Whiter Pastures?

That would be a novella in the Icebound series called All Mouth and No Trousers. It will be debuting soon - at the end of August. It’s a standalone story, but it takes place with the same characters--in different degrees of importance--as Whiter Pastures.

Thanks so much for having me here! I hope you’ll check out Whiter Pastures for yourself. I think you’ll agree that it earns its place here on Unusual Historicals!


About the Author

Xina Marie Uhl spends her days laboring in obscurity as a freelance writer for educational projects and dreaming of ways to scrounge up enough cash to: 1. travel the world, and 2. add to her increasing menagerie of dogs, cats, and other creatures. The rest of the time she writes fantasy, romance, historical fiction, and humor. She is the author of fantasy novel Necropolis, a collection of fantasy short stories called The Ruling Elite and Other Stories (with Janet Loftis), A Fairy Tail and Out of the Bag, a collection of humorous fantasy stories, and finally The Cat’s Guide to Human Behavior, a humorous self-help manual for cats struggling to understand their humans.

You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and WordPress, where she writes about historical research, writing, and whatever strikes her fancy. Join her occasional newsletter for character artwork, exclusive fiction, and up-to-date news on the release of her fantasy novel, The King’s Champion, and other projects.

17 August 2017

Excerpt Thursday: WHITER PASTURES by Xina Marie Uhl

This week, we're pleased to welcome author Xina Marie Uhl with her latest release, WHITER PASTURES (Icebound series). Join us again on Sunday for an author interview, with more details about the story. Here's the blurb about the novelette.

A romantic novelette in the Icebound series, an ongoing collection of polar delights.

Behold dogsleds and penguins. Howling winds and cold, pitiless wastes. This is Antarctica, where the intrepid inhabitants of the frozen ends of the earth battle the terrain, and each other, to find love—in a past much like that of the  early 1900s. 

Reluctant spinster Florance Barton fled to the British Antarctic base to escape a scandalous love affair. Amidst the handful of other women there, Florance is the perfect chambermaid, meek, mild, and forgettable. No one has a clue that she’s also a novice spy. 

When handsome young Handy McHanagan arrives at the base, he sets everyone agog. He’s charming, artistic, and ... an accomplished gardener. His arrival may be a mistake on the part of naval command. Or is it something more sinister?

Killer seals and subzero ice storms and aren’t the only danger in Antarctica: a enemy spy is on the loose. Florance has been ordered to choose between queen and country and her heart. Because penguin is off the menu nowand murder is its replacement.

Get your copy:


Ebook (Amazon: Kindle Unlimited or $1.49 purchase price)
XC Publishing / ISBN-13: 978-1-930805-91-0 / 41 pages
Author website / Amazon book page / Goodreads book page



**An Excerpt from WHITER PASTURES**

A Novelette

Hope Bay, Antarctica, 1900

The coal pan in the bottom of the heater had jammed again. Florance had tried all of her usual fixes—shoving it in further and yanking it out quickly, shimmying it from side to side, and wedging the metal handle of her favorite scrub brush in it to pry it open—but nothing would work.

"Must you make such a racket, girl?" Electa's voice somehow managed to communicate boredom, disdain, and irritation all at once. She didn't bother looking up from her typewriter but continued to pluck the keys one by one, hunting and pecking for each as if she were a particularly choosy hen searching for the perfect piece of corn.

Florance gritted her teeth. Electa knew her name—Florance had informed her of it on at least three separate occasions—but she couldn't be bothered to call her anything other than girl. When she deigned to speak to her at all, that is.

It vexed Florance that people insisted upon referring to her as a girl when eternal spinsterhood was drawing ever nearer at twenty-nine years of age. Florance knew the reason for it, though. She was a rather quiet person, not a stupid one. The help always had to scurry hither and thither, seen but not heard, while the decent people carried on with the important work. The ability to be invisible was the very thing that had brought her to this frozen base to begin with, after all.

With a discordant screech, the coal pan slid free, unbalancing Florance so that she landed squarely on her bustle. Coal dust puffed up in a cloud around her. She sneezed. Electa rolled her kohl-lined, brilliantly blue eyes in exasperation.

"Sorry, Mum," Florance mumbled before she could stop herself. She was trying not to mewl so much. It's just that her mouth sometimes functioned apart from her intentions.

Florance patted coal dust off her once-white apron, tucked that frizzy errant piece of hair back into her bun, and slipped on her trusty leather gloves before hurrying outside to the coal bin.

A gale had ended late last night, and this morning was clear and eye-wateringly bright, as usual. The atmosphere down here seemed thinner and drier than back in dreary old England, and she had never quite gotten used to it. Workmen hauled cordage and secured lines while scientists checked the weather station for readings and polished and oiled the delicate motors, instruments, and generators that had to be maintained at all cost. At the coal bin, she swept aside the powdery white snow covering it with a few abrupt motions. Thank heavens it came easily, unlike in the dead of winter when it was often necessary to bring a sharp iron stake and a hammer to remove the solid glistening mass.

As she scooped coal out of the bin and into the pail, a bitch trotted by, three half-grown pups following in single file. Dunderwaffle must have left the kennel doors open again. This summation was supported by the sight of two male dogs snarling at one another mere yards away, hackles raised and eyes alight with malice. She had been in the line of fire of fighting mongrels once before and had suffered a nasty ankle bite as a result.

"Get!" she shouted. She lobbed several good-sized chunks of coal at them. The smaller of the two danced off, ears flattened against his skull. The other, a black husky with unsettling yellow eyes, stood his ground, looking directly at her with teeth bared. Refusing to give in to the impulse to shrink back, she shouted louder and stepped toward him. "Go away!"

His canines shone white and fierce in the sunlight, but he slunk back before turning and trotting away as if that had been his intention all along.

"Menace," she accused under her breath.

With an awkward swing, she hefted the heavy pail of coal and made her way back to the Commandant's office to finish loading the heater.

She had gone no more than a dozen yards when suddenly, the weight of the pail vanished.

"Let me help you with that, miss," said a warm, strong male voice.

"Oh!" Florance squeaked. "Why, thank you, sir."

A flash of white teeth and a cheerful grin. Lively brown eyes met hers.

"My pleasure, you can be sure." He gave a slight bow. "Handy McHanagan at your service."

Did she detect a bit of a brogue? Heavens alive! Her heart fluttered like a bird caught in a trap.

She nodded. "Miss Florance Barton. So pleased to make your acquaintance."

As they walked, she stole glances at him. Younger than her, most probably. A foot taller, at least. Thick, dark hair neatly combed back around a zigzagging side part, and underneath, a face that she found utterly, completely, transformatively gorgeous in all ways, amen. She tried to control her burgeoning excitement. He must have arrived on this morning's ship. Certainly, she would have recognized him otherwise.

On the steps of the administration building, he paused, looking out at the post as men scurried about hatless and in shirtsleeves. At twenty-three degrees Fahrenheit, she was practically sweating herself.

A vaguely troubled expression flattened his lips. "I was sure it would be different here."

"In what way, sir?"

His eyes flickered to hers, and he gave a rueful smile. "Greener."

She didn't understand for a moment. Out here, green was for tinned vegetables and putrefying wounds, nothing else. Then she realized what he meant.

"Goodness, not another one! No one told you that you were headed to Hope Bay and not Hope Cay?"

He expelled air from his nostrils as he shook his head.

"And that Hope Bay lay in Antarctica?"

"Australia . . . Antarctica. They sound a bit alike."

No, love, she thought, they most certainly don't.

"If it's any consolation, you're not the first to have made that same mistake."

"I'm afraid I need a bit more than consolation right now." He looked rather crestfallen about the whole situation.

Well, he certainly wouldn't find that inside the administrative building. Quite the opposite, instead. But she kept her opinions to herself. 


About the Author

Xina Marie Uhl spends her days laboring in obscurity as a freelance writer for educational projects and dreaming of ways to scrounge up enough cash to: 1. travel the world, and 2. add to her increasing menagerie of dogs, cats, and other creatures. The rest of the time she writes fantasy, romance, historical fiction, and humor. She is the author of fantasy novel Necropolis, a collection of fantasy short stories called The Ruling Elite and Other Stories (with Janet Loftis), A Fairy Tail and Out of the Bag, a collection of humorous fantasy stories, and finally The Cat’s Guide to Human Behavior, a humorous self-help manual for cats struggling to understand their humans.

You can find her on Facebook, Twitter, and WordPress, where she writes about historical research, writing, and whatever strikes her fancy. Join her occasional newsletter for character artwork, exclusive fiction, and up-to-date news on the release of her fantasy novel, The King’s Champion, and other projects.


06 August 2017

Author Interview: Susan Wittig Albert on THE GENERAL'S WOMEN

This week, in partnership with Historical Fiction Virtual Book Tours, we're pleased to welcome author SUSAN WITTIG ALBERT with her latest release, THE GENERAL'S WOMEN. Here's the blurb about the novel.

A compelling story of love, betrayal, and ambition by New York Times bestselling author Susan Wittig Albert, The General’s Women tells the story of two women--Kay Summersby and Mamie Eisenhower—in love with the same man: General Dwight Eisenhower. Set during the chaotic years of World War II, The General’s Women tells the story of the conflicted relationship between General Dwight Eisenhower and Kay Summersby, his Irish driver/aide, and the impact of that relationship on Mamie Eisenhower and her life in Washington during the war. Told from three alternating points of view (Kay’s, Ike’s, and Mamie’s), the novel charts the deepening of the relationship as Ike and Kay move from England (1942) to North Africa (1942-43) to England, France, and Germany before and after the Normandy landing (1944-45). At the end of the war, Ike is faced with the heart-wrenching choice between marrying Kay and a political future. The story continues into the post-war years, as Ike (returning to Mamie) becomes Army Chief of Staff, president of Columbia University, Supreme Commander of NATO, and president of the United States. Kay, meanwhile, struggles to create a life and work of her own, writing two memoirs: the first (Eisenhower Was My Boss, 1948) about her war work with Ike; the second (Past Forgetting, 1976) about their love affair. An author’s note deals with the complicated question of the truth of Kay’s story, as it finally appears in the posthumously-published Past Forgetting. 

 
Praise for The General's Women

"The General's Women is an engrossing and humanizing account of a love that blossomed during wartime and scandalized a nation... A historical novel that is sympathetic, satisfying, and heartbreaking." —Foreword Reviews 

"A mature, gripping emotional drama... The arc of this multifaceted novel follows the three main characters [Ike, Kay, and Mamie] and a host of secondary ones through the war and back into civilian life. At every point Albert smoothly incorporates an obviously vast amount of research into a tale of raw emotional conflict that can make for some wonderfully uncomfortable reading." —Kirkus Reviews 

"A brilliant work of biographical fiction that will fascinate WW2 history fans. It tells the remarkable true story of General Dwight D Eisenhower and his relationship with his Irish-born driver and secretary, Kay Summersby, and with his longtime wife Mamie. It faithfully shines a light on the hidden relationship of the man behind the D-Day landings and what he got up to while 3,000 miles from his wife. A must read!" —Kieron Wood, author of Ike's Irish Lover: The Echo of A Sigh


**Q&A with Susan Wittig Albert**
We'd like to thank Susan for being a guest this week at Unusual Historicals as she shares details about her latest novel, The General’s Women.

What was the inspiration behind this novel?

Years ago, I happened on Kay Summersby’s memoir, Past Forgetting. Not long after, I saw the TV mini-series, Ike: The War Years, which starred Lee Remick as Kay. I loved her for her bravery. I wanted to know more about her than either the memoir or the film could tell me. I especially wanted to understand her relationship to Eisenhower and know more about what happened after the war. Did Ike really intend to divorce Mamie and marry Kay, as President Truman insisted? If that was his intention, why didn’t he follow through? What compelled her—and him—to do what they did?

I had a lot of questions that needed answers—and for me, the best way to answer a question, always, is to tell a story about it. This story just begged to be told.

How long did the research take and when did you know you had compiled enough to finish this novel?

The story I wanted to tell is a true story about real people, so I felt I needed to know what happened, in as detailed a way as possible. I spent five or six months reading the basic source material, as background. I started with Kay’s two memoirs, one written right after the war (Eisenhower Was My Boss), the other (Past Forgetting) published posthumously in 1976; for her postwar life, I used newspaper archives.

For the war itself, I read the dramatic and detailed Liberation Trilogy, by Rick Atkinson. For what went on in Eisenhower’s command, I relied heavily on the chatty, gossipy contemporaneous diary kept by Harry Butcher, Ike’s naval aide (My Three Years with Eisenhower)—fascinating reading. For Eisenhower, Jean Edward Smith’s Eisenhower in Peace and War seemed to tell the most coherent story—and to portray Ike’s flaws as clearly as his strengths. For Mamie, I read her granddaughter Susan’s biography, Mrs. Ike, plus contemporaneous newspaper reports. My sources are documented in the book’s notes.

Once I finished studying the background material, I knew enough to write the first page. For me, that’s when the serious research begins, because the writing forces me to confront what I don’t know. When I’m writing, I go from the page to the sources and back again, adding detail, fact-checking, adding more detail. And all the time, of course, I discover new sources by reading footnotes and bibliographies. In that sense, the research is never finished until the novel is finished.

Did you discover any surprises during your research?

I was nearly done with the book when I accidentally discovered a recently published biography of Kay, published in Ireland and written by Kieron Wood, an Irish lawyer who lives not far from Kay’s family home in County Cork. Kieron and I became email friends and he shared several enlightening insights into Kay’s life—things he had learned from his Irish sources. I was glad to have his information in time to incorporate it into the story itself. And glad that he agreed with the way I told Kay’s story.

Another surprise grew on me as I worked through the book and began to realize the enormous efforts made by Ike’s postwar staff and his family to cover up his relationship with Kay. They tried—pretty successfully, as it turned out—to erase Kay from his life and to discredit her account of their affair. For instance, I learned that the affair threatened to become an issue in the presidential campaign of 1952 and there was some interesting behind-the-scenes maneuvering to keep it quiet.  I guess I shouldn’t have been surprised at that, given the cover-ups we’ve seen in politics over the years. But I was.

What makes your major characters most compelling?

Wartime love affairs are probably a dime a dozen. Men and women are away from home and seeking comfort wherever they can find it under the urgent threats of war. But Eisenhower was not just any soldier: he was the top military commander in both the North African and European theaters of war. He had an unequalled reputation for integrity and square-dealing, and when he went to the White House his approval ratings would be higher than any other president. Mamie Eisenhower was widely admired for her staunch support of Ike during the war and an irreproachable icon of middle-class values during her eight years in the White House.

Brave, beautiful, and intelligent Kay Summersby was the quintessential Other Woman. During the war she was a threat to Mamie. After the war, she was a threat to Ike’s presidential ambitions.

As a love triangle, this is classic—and pretty darn compelling.

Who is your favorite author and why?

One of my favorite writers of biographical/historical fiction is Tom Mallon—and my favorite work of his is Watergate: The Novel. We all know the Watergate story: there is no longer any mystery about the plot. There’s Dick Nixon, of course, on his way to total collapse by the end of the book. And Pat Nixon, who is having a (fictional) affair that steadies her enough to survive the holocaust of her husband’s second term. But there’s also Howard Hunt and Rose Mary Woods, Elliot Richardson, Fred LaRue, and (my absolute favorite) Alice Roosevelt Longworth, an iron-willed old broad who will steal your heart. We know the plot, of course. But it turns out that we don’t know any of these characters until Mallon gives them to us, in all their many contradictory dimensions. I reread Watergate regularly, just to remind myself that such books can be written.

What advice would you offer other authors of fiction?

It’s the same advice I have for anyone who wants to write anything. Find a story, stay with it until you know it better than anyone else in the world, then write it. Do that again. And again. As many times as it takes.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

A NYT bestselling author, Susan's books include biographical fiction (A Wilder Rose 2013, currently under film option; Loving Eleanor 2016; and The General's Women 2017). Her mystery fiction includes the bestselling China Bayles mysteries; The Darling Dahlias; the Cottage Tales of Beatrix Potter; and the Robin Paige Victorian/Edwardian mysteries written with her husband, Bill Albert. Working together, the Alberts have also written over 60 young adult novels. Susan's most recent nonfiction work includes two memoirs: An Extraordinary Year of Ordinary Days and Together, Alone: A Memoir of Marriage and Place. Her earlier nonfiction work includes Work of Her Own, a study of women who left their careers, and Writing From Life: Telling Your Soul's Story, a guidebook for women memoirists. That book led to the founding of the Story Circle Network in 1997. She has edited two anthologies for the Story Circle Network: With Courage and Common Sense (2004) and What Wildness Is This: Women Write about the Southwest (2007). She currently serves as editor of StoryCircleBookReviews and co-coordinator of SCN's Sarton Women's Book Awards. She and Bill live in the Texas Hill Country, where she writes, gardens, and tends a varying assortment of barnyard creatures. For more information, please visit Susan Wittig Albert's website. You can also find her on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Google+, Goodreads, Amazon, and BookBub.  

16 June 2017

New & Noteworthy: June 16

Happy summer to our northern-hemisphere readers!

Blythe Gifford will be at the Romance Writers of America "Readers for Life" Literacy Autographing on Saturday, July 29, 3:00 – 5:00 p.m. ET, signing copies of her novel RUMORS AT COURT. More than 300 authors will participate. The event will be held at the Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort in the Pacifica Hall. All proceeds go to literacy organizations. For more information, visit: https://www.rwa.org/p/cm/ld/fid=564







M.J. Neary announces the release of her newest title, SIRENS OVER THE HUDSON! Though the novel is set 10 years ago and may not technically be historical fiction, it deals with the 2008 financial crisis and taps into various historical issues surrounding Wall Street and the culture of New York society. Learn more at the book's Amazon page here.







June brings Michelle Styles a bumper crop of publishing news from around the globe:
  • SOLD TO THE VIKING WARRIOR is now available in large print in the UK and Australia 
  • RETURN OF THE VIKING WARRIOR is now available in Portugal 
  • SAVED BY THE VIKING is out in France as Un Guerrier aux Yeux Clairs (The Warrior with the Clear Eyes)
  • TAMING HIS VIKING WOMAN is out in Germany as Die Wilde Braut de Wikingers (The Viking's Wild Bride)
  • SUMMER OF THE VIKING is out in Italy as L'uomo Venuto Dal Mare (The Man Who Came from the Sea)